Dear World Language Educator, If you were on Twitter…

Click Here!

This Image links to a pretty great slideshow of websites and online tools available for language teachers.

Although it was posted by a french teacher, keep in mind that a large number of language sites provide their content in Spanish and German as well.

This will get any language teacher going planning some ways to spice up your content delivery for sure for the upcoming school year!

I’m thinking it will be especially useful as I continue to explore the idea of flipping my classroom for some units of study next year. These links will be a great jumping-off point for me to begin to explore resources that allow students to “teach themselves” the content at home and come into class ready to practice using the language. Thanks for creating the slideshow, @sylviaduckworth!

An added bonus? Sylvia gives credit to who initially shared or re-tweeted each resource, which I’m hoping will be a great way for me to begin narrowing my Personal Learning Network (PLN) from “ed tech” in general to “ed tech: language educator” specifically.

About beckysearls

Married (DINK); High School Spanish Teacher; Lover of new technology (especially apple products!), Learner (of the life-long variety), Voracious Reader, Aspiring Writer, Tweeter, and now (or rather, a returning) Blogger!
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4 Responses to Dear World Language Educator, If you were on Twitter…

  1. HI Becky,

    I’m glad that you enjoyed the presentation! Are there any resources you would like me to add to it?

    Sylvia

  2. beckysearls says:

    Hi Sylvia!
    I LOVED the presentation. I still have to find the time to go through it and explore it with my Spanish-teacher hat in place. I’m sure there are things to add but I can’t think of them now. I will try and remember to shoot you a message on twitter with any resources I find that might be of use! Thanks for finding my blog!!

    -Becky

  3. Cristin says:

    Becky,

    I see you were planning on doing some flipped lessons. I am doing so research (ie. Google!!!) on this teaching model, and with world languages specifically. I would love to chat with you (via email) about how you’re incorporating the flipped model in your Spanish classes.

    • beckysearls says:

      Hi Cristin!
      I have done a few flipped lessons this year! I’ve found they work better with my level 3 students than my level 2 – they just seem more responsible with taking charge of “teaching themselves” content at home and coming in ready to apply it than my level 2 students – perhaps, for me, this is because my level 3’s are mostly sophomores and my level 2’s are mostly freshmen?

      This year, I did the 2 lessons listed on my flipped lesson plage (see link above) and a couple of other lessons on moodle, the course management system my school district uses. One or two times I did a full moodle lesson which was probably more trouble than it was worth logistically (moodle is not particularly user-friendly in my experience) and not very replicable in other formats (disadvantage). More often, I kept it simple and just made guided notes to match up with pages of my students’ textbook or studyspanish.com lessons or a youtube video I found and then posted the guided notes and links to the necessary information on my moodle. Students were then typically given a couple of nights to fill in the guided notes using the links to necessary information (or, alternatively, I’ve done these flipped lessons as a sub plan if I can get lab space on a day I know I will be out – this is really great because the students really learn and are self-directed in your absence). I just did this recently with the Conditional Tense to prep my level 3 students for learning the sequence of tenses for Si Clauses and it seems to have really helped them master the endings for the conditional.

      I’d love to swap ideas – I would in no way say I’ve mastered the flipped classroom, nor do I plan on every whole-sale adopting it and throwing away my other methods, but, on occasion, I find this paradigm very useful!

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